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By GCN Staff

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NIH's Biowulf gets HPC infusion

The National Institutes of Health's upgraded its Biowulf supercomputing cluster, which is used by biomedical researchers to process large numbers of simultaneous computations.

Installed by high-performance computing services provider CSRA, this second stage adds 1,104  compute nodes from Hewlett Packard Enterprise, with Intel processor and NVIDIA GPU technology; an additional 4.8 petabytes of storage from DataDirect Networks; Infiniband interconnect components from Mellanox Technologies; and Ethernet switches from Brocade Communication Systems.

Biowulf is the main computational resource at NIH's High-Performance Computation Systems group. Its Linux cluster is designed for work in genomics, image processing and  statistical analysis, as well as large-scale distributed memory tasks such as molecular dynamics.

In 2016, the NIH’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute conducted a test that pitted Biowulf against a third-party cloud to see if the cloud-based provided advantages for compute-intensive research. Though the performance on Biowulf and the cloud was similar, the cloud saved time overall, because researchers didn’t have to wait for available computing time on the shared Biowulf system.

Posted by GCN Staff on Aug 03, 2017 at 9:08 AM


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