Insider threat detection tools: Hard to find, harder to fund

A new survey shows that with little money to spend on tools aimed at insider threats, most organizations have to limp along by jerry-rigging existing, and unsuitable, cybersecurity tools to do the job.

While most of the emphasis in cybersecurity seems to be on external threats and the damage suffered when network and data defenses are breached, threats from insiders are getting more attention in the aftermath of the Snowden and Wikileaks revelations. What to do about those is another question, since the tools currently used by organizations to track incursions don’t seem up to the task.

It’s not a new phenomenon. The FBI a long time ago began voicing its concern about threats from privileged users of data, both in government and industry. The issue has its very own website at the FBI, and the concern within government was bolstered by a White House memo published at the end of 2012 aimed at the heads of agencies.

Now comes a survey by the Ponemon Institute, sponsored by Raytheon, that shows where the recognition/mitigation gap lies.

Over all of the government and industry sources surveyed, for example, 88 percent said they recognized that the insider threat is a cause for alarm, and that the abuse will increase. At the same time, however, they said they have difficulty identifying what specific threatening action looks like.

chart showing challenges in establish whether an event is an insider threat

Source: Insider Threat Ponemon Survey Report

“Responders said they just don’t have enough contextual information from their existing tools, which also throw up too many false positives,” said Michael Crouse, Raytheon’s director of insider threat strategies. “There’s a real need for a different way to attack the problem.”

Unlike external threats, where malicious intent is assumed, the situation with insiders is more nuanced. Of those who access sensitive or confidential information that isn’t necessary for their jobs, for example, survey respondents said as many as two-thirds are simply driven by curiosity.

In government, you can probably add the frustration of people under increasing pressure to get the job done and who don’t want to spend the time working through the red tape necessary to access information they think they need. Who hasn’t asked a buddy in the office to help with that kind of thing?

Other recent studies have also made the point that insider threats come from relatively innocent actions as much, or even more, than malicious events. Verizon’s 2014 Data Breach Investigation Report, for example, showed that misuse by insiders could come from something as simple as sending an email to the wrong person or attaching files that shouldn’t be attached.

One simple move toward an answer would be for organizations to properly configure tools they do have, something Crouse said is “the easiest and most cost-effective” thing they can do. Beyond that, agencies  need complementary tools, such as end-point monitoring that show how users behave when they access data through an end-point, detailing IM traffic, contextual emails and whether they are cutting and pasting information in ways they haven’t previously.

That’s all well and good, of course, but there’s a big catch. While nearly 90 percent of those surveyed in the Ponemon report said they understood the need for enhanced security, only 40 percent had any kind of a dedicated budget to spend on tools specifically aimed at insider threats. That’s why most organizations — and certainly government agencies — have to limp along by trying to jerry-rig existing, and unsuitable, cybersecurity tools to do the job.

One of the reasons for that budget shortfall, Crouse gamely admitted, is that companies like his have not done a good job explaining the ROI from money spent on these tools. What organizations don’t understand, he said, is that while the number of actual breaches from insiders is low compared to those from external threats, the impact from those breaches is substantially higher.

“I don’t think they truly understand either the monetary or mission impact from these insider breaches,” he said. “They’re just now trying to get their heads around that.”

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.