Mobile and Wireless

Why the new WiFi standard means fast times for wireless nets

It’s all about spectrum allocation, and devices with access to the 60 GHz band, 802.11ac devices would have enough to transmit uncompressed video, for example.

With eduroam, university users get secure WiFi access to the cloud

The wireless Internet service, widely used in Europe, is being expanded in the United States by Internet2, the University of Tennessee and the National Science Foundation.

Android malware builds 3D model of user's environment

A team from Indiana University frames PlaceRaider as a potential tool for burglars, but what if it got into government buildings?

The Wireless Gigabit Alliance: IEEE's not-so-secret society

The Wireless Gigabit Alliance, also known as WiGig,has been tasked by the IEEE to discover new ways to expand into gigabit-plus wireless communications.

802.11ac WiFi could help agencies cope with BYOD

The emerging WiFi standard could double the speed of your agency's wireless network ... once you have the equipment to take advantage of it.

From shipments to socks and ants, RFID is tagging everything

Modern RFID tags are only a few millimeters in size and comprise a chip, antenna and in some cases a battery (active). Some forms of RFID tags (passive) have no battery, but actually take power from the electromagnetic beams of a reader, and then send data back to the source. These tags can theoretically last forever, since they only send data or require power when actually being pinged by a reader device. Almost all RFID tags can be inserted into almost anything and do not require line of sight back to a reader. Some tags are so tiny that they have been glued to the backs of ants to track their behavior.

Army puts a 4G battlefield telemedicine system to the test

A real-time system that connects medics on the battlefield with surgeons at a hospital would save lives, if it can be made to work.

My other car is a smart phone

Cisco wants to network and IP-enable vehicles, which could be a boon for emergency response crews, among others.

NOAA, Navy swimming with the SHARCs

Unmanned ocean-going Wave Gliders proving useful for research and, perhaps, much more.

Keys to mobile security: Consistent controls, user common sense

GAO report on mobile threats concludes that certain agencies, and all users, can help improve security.

iPhone erodes BlackBerry's last enterprise edge – security

IT administrators, noting steady improvements to the iPhone's security since its debut, are finding fewer reasons to hold on to BlackBerry.

What is LTE, and why is it right for a public safety network?

The details of a national public safety network have yet to be worked out, but the consensus is it will be based on the emerging Long Term Evolution standard.

Public safety network has ‘eye-opening’ first real-world test

Police on the street and in the crowd used iPhones for encrypted voice, data and video, free of the congestion that can hamper a commercial wireless network.

Chip encrypts Android calls, without the lag time

TrustCall system can turn almost any Android phone into a secure communication device.

GOP platform: Sell off government spectrum

The pro-business platform calls for auctioning off surplus RF spectrum and condemns government regulation of the Internet — except when it should be regulated.

The grace period on mobile security is over

As the bad guys turn their attention to mobile devices, the government has begun mapping out security that needs to be incorporated in coming generations of this technology.

USDA expects to manage 100,000 mobile devices

The department's planned Next Generation Mobility solution will manage mobile devices, applications and security.