opengov financial dashboard

OpenGov helps local governments compare spending

State and local governments no longer have to collect and analyze data from different jurisdictions to find out how their budgets and expenditures compare to other localities, thanks to a new online tool called Comparisons from OpenGov, a cloud-based financial reporting and intelligence company.

Available only to subscribers of the OpenGov Intelligence package, Comparisons uses data from OpenGov’s government clients and combines that with census metrics and financial data to give government finance directors and administrators the ability to see how they match up with the budgets, and expenditures of other local governments.

“It provides government officials and department heads unprecedented access to information to improve efficiency and make better policy decisions,” OpenGov’s co-founder Zac Bookman explained in a blog post.

Users interested in seeing the public safety spending across neighboring jurisdictions, for example, would click “public safety” in the Chart of Accounts. Expenditures for other localities would appear in an “apples to apples” comparison, according to the blog post.

More than 500 governments in 40 states and three Canadian provinces are using OpenGov, according to the company's website.

About the Author

Bianca Spinosa is an Editorial Fellow at FCW.

Spinosa covers a variety of federal technology news for FCW including workforce development, women in tech, and the intersection of start-ups and agencies. Prior to joining FCW, she was a TV journalist for more than six years, reporting local news in Virginia, Kentucky, and North Carolina. Spinosa is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Writing at George Mason University, where she also teaches composition. She earned her B.A. from the University of Virginia.

Click here for previous articles by Spinosa, or connect with her on Twitter: @BSpinosa.


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