Options for FirstNet opt-outs

Options for FirstNet opt-outs

States considering opting out of the FirstNet nationwide public safety broadband network  (NPSBN) and building their own interoperable Radio Access Network (RAM) face an expensive, time-consuming and complex process that comes with a tight deadline.

To support those states, the First Responder Network Authority is developing an interoperability compliance matrix that will document the technical standards, key data elements and network policies that states must meet to ensure their RAN is interoperable with the NPSBN. FirstNet previewed that guidance in a recent blog.

FirstNet is also working with the Federal Communications Commission and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration to ensure they have the necessary information to assess and approve state RAN plans.

To receive approval from the FCC, states and territories must make sure their RAN is compliant with the technical requirements from the Interoperability Board report and interoperable with the NPSBN.

After FCC approval, a state must apply to the NTIA to lease spectrum capacity from FirstNet for its RAN, and if needed, request a grant to help with funding. NTIA requires that states show they have the technical capabilities to operate and maintain the RAN and that their alternative plans are cost effective and have similar timelines, security, coverage and quality of service to that of FirstNet.

Because FirstNet is aware of the requirements and complexities of developing a RAN within the law’s narrow timeline to submit an alternative plan, it will provide additional support throughout the process.  State officials recently voiced concerns about FirstNet implementation at a Senate oversight hearing.

Working with its network partner -- which is expected to be chosen late this year -- FirstNet plans to finalize the details of the matrix that will outline the technical standards and network policies needed to connect any state-built RAN to the NPSBN.

The FCC and NTIA will also provide more guidance to states and territories about their respective roles in the compliance and approval processes. 

About the Author

Amanda Ziadeh is a Reporter/Producer for GCN.

Prior to joining 1105 Media, Ziadeh was a contributing journalist for USA Today Travel's Experience Food and Wine site. She's also held a communications assistant position with the University of Maryland Office of the Comptroller, and has reported for the American Journalism Review, Capitol File Magazine and DC Magazine.

Ziadeh is a graduate of the University of Maryland where her emphasis was multimedia journalism and French studies.

Click here for previous articles by Ms. Ziadeh or connect with her on Twitter: @aziadeh610.


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Reader Comments

Wed, Jul 20, 2016 Kristin

This is very concerning. The entire communications, logistics (which include but not limited to vehicles) all in ONE "network"? providing emergency communications in ONE network, which is a corporation, that is using public monies? Essentially extorting states to opt in? no- the only option is to opt OUT, which is not only difficult but expensive. What about states that are strapped? This is forcing them to take it. The NTIA is accepting public comments- but who outside of the comms or public service industry has even HEARD of FirstNet, let alone what FirstNet is all about? This is a technocratic NIGHT mare. Emergency comms by broadband? in one center? What could(nt) go wrong! This is outrageous, and quite stunning if you ask me.

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